Repairing a Broken Nose

Nasal fractures and broken noses in Utah are common. Noses can be injured while playing sports—baseball, football, rugby, skiing, wrestling and many other activities are common causes of broken noses.

Noses can also become fractured in accidents. And noses can be broken as part of rhinoplasty to help enhance the look of a patient through cosmetic nasal surgery or the nose.

While a broken nose is painful and produces swelling, our Utah ENT doctors are expert at setting and treating broken noses. We’ve written this article to help you understand what you can expect following a broken nose.

Setting a Broken Nose

Broken noses with crooked nasal bones can often be set right in the office after numbing the nose, and this is not a particularly painful procedure. It must be done within two weeks of the injury, before the bones begin to set in their new position. If more than two weeks have passed since the injury, we usually have to wait at least six months to let the bones completely set in their new position, and then perform a formal rhinoplasty.

What to Expect Following a Broken Nose

If it is necessary to break the nasal bones to straighten the nose or reduce the size, you can expect to have black eyes for one to two weeks. Fortunately, the swelling in the nose and face starts to go down after about three days. However, your ENT doctor may prescribe painkillers for the first week.

Read: Recovery from Nose Surgery

We recommend our patients lie low for a week or so to enable their nose to heal. That means you may want to schedule a few weeks off work to provide time for bruising and swelling to decrease.

Contact the Ear, Nose and Throat Center for Questions about a Broken Nose

If you have a fractured nose or wonder if nose surgery is right for you, please contact the Ear, Nose and Throat Center at 801-328-2522 for a consultation and treatment. We’ll work with you to diagnose and treat your condition in the most effective manner that helps you once again breathe easy following a broken
nose.

Read: What is Rhinoplasty and Reconstructive Nasal Surgery?

Read: How to Prepare for Nose Surgery

Read: What to Expect During Rhinoplasty Surgery

Read: Recovery from Rhinoplasty

Read: 3 Reasons to Get a Nose Job

Read: 5 Signs You May Have a Deviated Septum